Attempted forced titration of blood pressure to <130/85 mm Hg in type 2 diabetic hypertensive patients in clinical practice: the diastolic cost.

Esther Osher, Yona Greenman, Karen Tordjman, Eldad Kisch, Galina Shenkerman, Michael Koffler, Itzhak Shapira, Naftali Stern

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The authors assessed the practicality and results of forced titrating of blood pressure to <130/85 mm Hg based on guidelines of the sixth Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure in the setting of a clinical practice in 257 diabetic, hypertensive patients. Goal diastolic pressure was achieved in 90% of the patients, but goal systolic pressure was achieved in only 33%. In 57% of the patients, the attained diastolic pressure was < or =70 mm Hg, and in 20% of the cohort diastolic pressure was reduced to <70 mm Hg (mean, 60+/-1 mm Hg). Patients with final diastolic pressure <70 mm Hg were older, had a higher prevalence of coronary artery disease, and higher initial systolic and pulse pressures compared with patients with final diastolic pressure of 71-85 mm Hg. Thus, attempted lowering of blood pressure to <130/85 mm Hg is associated with excessive lowering of diastolic pressure in a significant number of patients. Whether the benefits of tight systolic control outweigh the risks of excessive diastolic reduction requires further prospective assessment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)29-34
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Hypertension
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2006

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