Associations between race and ethnicity and perioperative outcomes among women undergoing hysterectomy for adenomyosis

Raanan Meyer*, Christina Maxey, Kacey M. Hamilton, Yosef Nasseri, Moshe Barnajian, Gabriel Levin, Mireille D. Truong, Kelly N. Wright, Matthew T. Siedhoff

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To study racial and ethnic disparities among women undergoing hysterectomy performed for adenomyosis across the United States. Design: A cohort study. Setting: Data from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) from 2012–2020. Patients: Patients with an adenomyosis diagnosis. Intervention: Hysterectomy for adenomyosis. Main Outcome Measures: Patients were identified using the International Classification of Diseases 9th and 10th editions codes 617.0 and N80.0 (endometriosis of the uterus). Hysterectomies were classified on the basis of the Current Procedural Terminology codes. We compared baseline and surgical characteristics and 30-day postoperative complications across the different racial and ethnic groups. Postoperative complications were classified into minor and major complications according to the Clavien-Dindo classification system. Results: A total of 12,599 women underwent hysterectomy for adenomyosis during the study period: 8,822 (70.0%) non-Hispanic White, 1,597 (12.7%) Hispanic, 1,378 (10.9%) non-Hispanic Black or African American, 614 (4.9%) Asian, 97 (0.8%) Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, and 91 (0.7%) American Indian or Alaska Native. Postoperative complications occurred in 8.8% of cases (n = 1,104), including major complications in 3.1% (n = 385). After adjusting for confounders, non-Hispanic Black race and ethnicity were independently associated with an increased risk of major complications (adjusted odds ratio 1.54, 95% confidence interval [CI] {1.16–2.04}). Laparotomy was performed in 13.7% (n = 1,725) of cases. Compared with non-Hispanic White race and ethnicity, the adjusted odd ratios for undergoing laparoscopy were 0.58 (95% CI 0.50–0.67) for Hispanic, 0.56 (95% CI 0.48–0.65) for non-Hispanic Black or African American, 0.33 (95% CI 0.27–0.40) for Asian, and 0.26 (95% CI 0.17–0.41) for Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander race and ethnicity. Conclusion: Among women undergoing hysterectomy for postoperatively diagnosed adenomyosis, non-Hispanic Black or African American race and ethnicity were associated with an increased risk of major postoperative complications. Compared with non-Hispanic White race and ethnicity, Hispanic ethnicity, non-Hispanic Black or African American, Asian, Native Hawaiian, or Pacific Islander race and ethnicity were less likely to undergo minimally invasive surgery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1053-1062
Number of pages10
JournalFertility and Sterility
Volume121
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2024
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Disparity
  • endometriosis
  • laparoscopy
  • laparotomy

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