Association of age at onset of migraine with family history of migraine in children attending a pediatric headache clinic: A retrospective cohort study

Tal Eidlitz-Markus, Yishay Haimi-Cohen, Avraham Zeharia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Aim: Migraine is known to run in families and has long been considered a strongly heritable disorder. This study sought to evaluate the relationship between age at onset of pediatric migraine and family history of migraine. Methods: Review of the medical files of the headache clinic of a tertiary pediatric medical center yielded 344 children with migraine for whom details on migraine in family members were available. Results: Mean age of the cohort was 11.69±3.49 years, and mean frequency of headache per month, 13.68±11.26. Mean age at migraine onset in patients with a negative parental history was10.48±3.39 years; in patients with one parent with migraine, 8.84±3.72 years; and in patients with both parents with migraine, 7.32±3.22 years (p<0.001).The duration of migraine attacks (in hours) was significantly longer in patients with any family member with migraine than in those with no family history (p=0.026). Conclusions: Among children attending a tertiary pediatric headache clinic, migraine appears at a younger age in those with parental history of migraine than in those with a negative family history. The findings suggest that having a genetic background of migraine makes a child more susceptible to migraine earlier in life than a child without a family history.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)722-727
Number of pages6
JournalCephalalgia
Volume35
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 12 Jul 2015

Keywords

  • Pediatric
  • age
  • migraine onset
  • parental migraine

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