Assessment of the Hypothalamic‐Pituitary‐Testicular Function in Male Patients with Wilson's Disease

MOSHE FRYDMAN*, ARIEH KAUSCHANSKY, BATSHEVA BONNE‐TAMIR, FARES NASSAR, ROY HOMBURG

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

ABSTRACT: Sixteen male patients with Wilson's disease were studied to detect potential endocrine dysfunctions. There was no clinical evidence of feminization in any of the patients, and the patient group spanned most pubertal stages. Gonadotropin, testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate, androstenedione, estradiol, prolactin, cortisol, thyrotropin, and free thyroxine levels were determined. Low or borderline luteinizing hormone (LH) levels were present in most of the patients. In six of the adult patients, a standard gonadotropin‐releasing hormone (GnRH) test was performed. Five of the six patients had blunted LH and follicle‐stimulating hormone (FSH) responses to GnRH. Increased androgen levels were found in eight of the patients. Sex hormone binding globulin was normal in eight of nine tested patients. Three single‐dose human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) stimulation tests of six adult patients showed normal responses. Three other patients who had elevated baseline levels responded with modest increases. Since liver disease is usually associated with decreased androgen levels, it is difficult to account for the elevated androgen levels. Both increased androgen levels and copper accumulation in the hypophysis could be responsible for the blunted GnRH response. 1991 American Society of Andrology

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)180-184
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Andrology
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1991

Keywords

  • Liver disease
  • gonadotropins
  • gonadotropin‐releasing hormone (GnRH) test
  • human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) test
  • testosterone

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