Assessing the Different Oncologic Disease Distribution and Postoperative Complications of Octogenarian and Nonagenarian Head and Neck Oncology Patients

Doron Sagiv*, Sahar Nadel, Yoav Pinhas Talmi, Ran Yahalom, Michael Wolf, Eran Emanuel Alon

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: The admission rate of patients aged 80 years or older (oldest-old) with head and neck (HN) oncologic disease is on the rise. Our goal was to study the demographic characteristics, reasons for admission, types of surgical procedures, and postoperative complications of the oldest-old patients with HN malignancy. Materials and Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study including all inpatients aged 80 years or older who were admitted to the department of otolaryngology–head and neck surgery or department of oral and maxillofacial surgery because of HN oncologic disease between 2009 and 2013. The control group was composed of a matched number of randomly selected patients aged 60 to 79 years. We compared the demographic characteristics, diagnoses, comorbidities, surgical interventions, and postoperative complications of the 2 age groups to characterize the oldest-old patients' admissions and determine whether age alone increases the risk of postoperative complications. Results: The study included 109 oldest-old patients (median age, 83 years) and 107 patients in the control group (median age, 68 years). Although the oldest-old patients had significantly more underlying diseases (4.41 vs 2.86) and drugs prescribed (4.76 vs 3.21), similar rates of postoperative complications occurred in both groups. An important finding was that ischemic heart disease and chronic lung disease were the only significant risk factors for postoperative complications among the oldest-old patients (odds ratio on multivariate analysis of 5.5 and 4.5, respectively). Conclusions: Although comorbidities and prescribed drugs are more prevalent in the oldest-old patients, the rate of postoperative complications did not differ between the age groups, suggesting that age alone should not be a factor in the surgical treatment of HN malignancies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1355-1360
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Volume76
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2018

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