Are we suffering from the Peltzman effect? Risk perception among recovered and vaccinated people during the COVID-19 pandemic in Israel

A. Kaim, M. Saban

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: The challenge of waning immunity and reinfection has been an acknowledged concern since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. In the ongoing outbreak, reinfection rates are increasing alongside breakthrough cases among vaccinated individuals. The objective of this study was to examine the demographic characteristics associated with vaccination uptake among individuals previously infected with COVID-19 and to evaluate the period elapsed between the last vaccine dose and infection. Study design: XXX Methods: Data were extracted from the Israeli Ministry of Health's open COVID-19 database. Results: The study found that uptake of vaccination in previously infected individuals is relatively low. When examining gender, previously infected females were more likely to receive vaccination than previously infected males. Similarly, differences in vaccination uptake exist between age groups. When examining the interval between the last vaccine dose and infection, the most significant breakthrough infection rate was observed among individuals aged 20–59 years. Conclusions: This study shows that there are specific populations subgroups that may serve as reservoirs of viral spread. Individuals in these groups may experience a false sense of security from a perceived sense of acquired long-term immunity, resulting in low levels of vaccine uptake and non-compliance with protective behaviours. Targeted messaging should be used to reemphasise the need for continued protective behaviours.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)19-22
Number of pages4
JournalPublic Health
Volume209
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • Health policy
  • Uptake
  • Vaccination

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