Are rotating tourniquets useful for left ventricular preload reduction in patients with acute myocardial infarction and heart failure?

Arie Roth, Marek Hochenberg, Gad Keren, Reuven Terdiman, Shlomo Laniado*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We examined the hemodynamic effects of congesting cuffs (rotating tourniquets) in 12 patients with first acute myocardial infarction and new onset of congestive heart failure 24 to 48 hours after admission. Congesting cuffs were applied for two periods of 15 minutes each, 15 minutes apart, and inflated to 30 mm Hg and 60 mm Hg consecutively. No change was noticed in mean pulmonary artery wedge pressure, which was 20±3 mm Hg at the beginning of the study and 19±3 mm Hg at the completion (P > .05, NS), nor in other hemodynamic and blood gases parameters. Patients' clinical conditions remained unchanged. We conclude that application of congesting cuffs at pressures of 30 mm Hg and 60 mm Hg does not result in any change in clinical or hemodynamic data in patients with acute myocardial infarction and new onset of congestive heart failure.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)764-767
Number of pages4
JournalAnnals of Emergency Medicine
Volume16
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1987
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • rotating tourniquets
  • tourniquets
  • ventricular preload reduction

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