Application of hyperspectral remote sensing in the longwave infrared region to assess the influence of dust from the desert on soil surface mineralogy

Gila Notesco*, Shahar Weksler, Eyal Ben-Dor

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Soil mineralogy can be used to study changes in the environment affecting the soil surface, such as dust from the desert through Aeolian processes, which is one of the sources that determine the mineral nature of the soil. Ground-and field-based hyperspectral longwave infrared images, acquired before and after dust dispersion on the soil surface, were processed and analyzed by applying a procedure for determining soil surface mineralogy from the emissivity spectrum, using two indices-SQCMI (the Soil Quartz Clay Mineral Index) and SCI (the Soil Carbonate Index)-to identify changes in the abundance of quartz, clay minerals and carbonates on the surface, caused by the settling dust particles. Mineralogical changes were identified, depending on the mineral composition of the dust compared to the soil surface mineralogy.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1388
JournalRemote Sensing
Volume12
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 May 2020

Funding

FundersFunder number
Ministry of Science, Technology and Space68740

    Keywords

    • Desert dust
    • Emissivity spectrum
    • Hyperspectral remote sensing
    • Longwave infrared image
    • Soil mineralogy

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