Anxiety and support resources for Israeli women before gynecological surgery

Anat Peles Bortz, Irit Bluvstein, Liat Bergman, Sivia Barnoy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Gynecologic surgery is a frequent procedure for benign and malignant diseases and may evoke anxiety and a need for support. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether women with suspicion of gynecologic malignancy and those with no suspicion of gynecologic malignancy had different sources of social support and the relationship between this support and their anxiety. A descriptive cross-sectional method was used at a large medical center. Data were collected between June and December 2010 from 100 hospitalized women 20–28 hours prior to gynecologic surgery: 50 with suspicion of gynecologic malignancy and 50 with no suspicion of gynecologic malignancy. Social Support and Anxiety Questionnaires were distributed to the participants. The results showed that sources of support differed between the groups: women with suspicion of gynecologic malignancy reported receiving more support from their family and from the nursing staff while women with no suspicion of gynecologic malignancy reported receiving more support from friends or the Internet. Both groups reported similar levels of anxiety. Because women seek support prior to gynecologic surgery, healthcare professionals should play a more active role by offering their support in addition to guiding patients to websites that aim to provide information and support.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)329-341
Number of pages13
JournalWomen and Health
Volume57
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 16 Mar 2017

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • cancer
  • social support

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