Antibody-specific behavioral effects: Intracerebroventricular injection of antiphospholipid antibodies induces hyperactive behavior while anti-ribosomal-P antibodies induces depression and smell deficits in mice

Aviva Katzav*, Tal Ben-Ziv, Miri Blank, Chaim G. Pick, Yehuda Shoenfeld, Joab Chapman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study compares the effects of human antiphospholipid (aPL) and anti-P-ribosomal (anti-P) IgG and control IgG on the brain. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) injected aPL mice (exAPS) displayed specific hyperactivity compared to anti-P-injected (exSLE) and control mice. In contrast ICV injected anti-P-injected mice specifically displayed depression-like behavior and olfactory impairment compared to the other 2 groups. Both anti-P and aPL injected mice were impaired in the passive avoidance test compared to controls. The distinct cognitive effects of the 2 pathogenic antibodies argue for a specific and differential direct action of these autoantibodies on the brain in clinical disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)10-15
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Neuroimmunology
Volume272
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Keywords

  • Autoantibodies
  • Behavior
  • Cognitive function
  • Depression
  • Experimental mouse model
  • Smell

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