Antibiotic treatment does not ameliorate the metabolic changes in rats presenting dysbiosis after consuming a high fructose diet

Ariel Bier, Rawan Khasbab, Yael Haberman, Tzipi Braun, Rotem Hadar, Katya Sosnovski, Amnon Amir, Avshalom Leibowitz*, Grossman Ehud

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

High fructose consumption is one of the hallmarks of Western diets and has been found to induce MeS symptoms in parallel to gut microbial dysbiosis. However, the causality between those two is still elusive. Here, we studied whether a significant modification of gut microbial composition by antibiotics can influence the fructose-induced metabolic changes. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into four groups including controls, controls + antibiotics, high fructose diet (HFrD, 60% fructose), HFrD + antibiotics (n = 7–8 in each group) for a period of 8-weeks. The high fructose diet increased blood pressure (BP), triglyceride (TG), fatty liver and the expression of hepatic genes related to lipogenesis, and fructose transport and metabolism. In addition, fructose changed the microbial composition and increased acetic and butyric acids in fecal samples but not in the blood. Antibiotic treatment significantly reduced microbial diversity and modified the microbial composition in the samples. However, minimal or no effect was seen in the metabolic phenotypes. In conclusion, high fructose consumption (60%) induced metabolic changes and dysbiosis in rats. However, antibiotic treatment did not reverse the metabolic phenotype. Therefore, the metabolic changes are probably independent of a specific microbiome profile.

Original languageEnglish
Article number203
JournalNutrients
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2020

Funding

FundersFunder number
Tel Aviv University

    Keywords

    • Dysbiosis
    • Fructose
    • Metabolic syndrome
    • Microbiome

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