Anesthesia for Patients Undergoing Anesthesia for Elective Thoracic Surgery During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Consensus Statement From the Israeli Society of Anesthesiologists

Ruth Shaylor, Vladimir Verenkin, Idit Matot

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Anesthesia for thoracic surgery requires specialist intervention to provide adequate operating conditions and one-lung ventilation. The pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome–associated coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is transmitted by aerosol and droplet spread. Because of its virulence, there is a risk of transmission to healthcare workers if appropriate preventive measures are not taken. Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients may show no clinical signs at the early stages of the disease or even remain asymptomatic for the whole course of the disease. Despite the lack of symptoms, they may be able to transfer the virus. Unfortunately, during current COVID-19 testing procedures, about 30% of tests are associated with a false-negative result. For these reasons, standard practice is to assume all patients are COVID-19 positive regardless of swab results. Here, the authors present the recommendations produced by the Israeli Society of Anesthesiologists for use in thoracic anesthesia for elective surgery during the COVID-19 pandemic for both the general population and COVID-19–confirmed patients. The objective of these recommendations is to make changes to some routine techniques in thoracic anesthesia to augment patients’ and the medical staff's safety.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3211-3217
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia
Volume34
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2020

Keywords

  • bronchoscopy
  • COVID-19
  • pain management
  • postoperative care
  • thoracic surgery

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