Analyzing Blood Cells of High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome Patients Using Interferometric Phase Microscopy and Fluorescent Flow Cytometry

Itay Barnea*, Lior Luria, Arik Girsault, Ofira Dabah, Matan Dudaie, Simcha K. Mirsky, Drorit Merkel, Natan T. Shaked

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) are a group of potentially deadly diseases that affect the morphology and function of neutrophils. Rapid diagnosis of MDS is crucial for the initiation of treatment that can vastly improve disease outcome. In this work, we present a new approach for detecting morphological differences between neutrophils isolated from blood samples of high-risk MDS patients and blood bank donors (BBDs). Using fluorescent flow cytometry, neutrophils were stained with 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCF), which reacts with reactive oxygen species (ROS), and Hoechst, which binds to DNA. We observed that BBDs possessed two cell clusters (designated H and L), whereas MDS patients possessed a single cluster (L). Later, we used FACS to sort the H and the L cells and used interferometric phase microscopy (IPM) to image the cells without utilizing cell staining. IPM images showed that H cells are characterized by low optical path delay (OPD) in the nucleus relative to the cytoplasm, especially in cell vesicles containing ROS, whereas L cells are characterized by low OPD in the cytoplasm relative to the nucleus and no ROS-containing vesicles. Moreover, L cells present a higher average OPD and dry mass compared to H cells. When examining neutrophils from MDS patients and BBDs by IPM during flow, we identified ~20% of cells as H cells in BBDs in contrast to ~4% in MDS patients. These results indicate that IPM can be utilized for the diagnosis of complex hematological pathologies such as MDS.

Original languageEnglish
Article number256
JournalBioengineering
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2024

Funding

FundersFunder number
Horizon2020 ERC101100664

    Keywords

    • hematology
    • interferometric phase microscopy
    • myelodysplastic syndromes

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