An ordered arrangement of chromosomes in the somatic nucleus of common wheat, Triticum aestivum L. - I. Spatial relationships between chromosomes of the same genome

Lydia Avivi*, Moshe Feldman, Morton Brown

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Spatial relationships between chromosomes of the same genome, both homologous and non-homologous, were studied in root-tip cells of common wheat, Triticum aestivum (2n = 6x = 42). Mean distance between members of all the 21 homologous pairs (seven in each of the three genomes) and of 45 out of the 63 possible non-homologous combinations of two (21 in each genome) were determined. To minimize disruption of nuclear chromosomal arrangement, the cells were pretreated with cold temperature either in tap water or in a physiological medium (White solution) and distances between cytologically marked chromosomes were measured at metaphase. Comparison of distances for homologues with those for non-homologues indicated clearly that, within each genome, the homologous chromosomes were significantly closer to one another than were the non-homologues. Distances between homologues were similar in all three genomes, as were distances between non-homologues. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that the chromosomes of each genome of common wheat are arranged in the somatic nucleus in a highly specific ordered pattern. In this hypothetical arrangement, homologous chromosomes are closely associated, while the nonhomologues occupy definite positions with respect to one another. The universality of the phenomenon and its cellular mechanism and biological significance are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-16
Number of pages16
JournalChromosoma
Volume86
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1982

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