An imperiled promised land: The antecedents of Israel's environmental crises and prospects for progress

Alon Tal*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Israel's rapid economic development has had a steep environmental price. Despite remarkable achievements in such areas as solar heating, waste water reuse and reclamation of desert lands, most environmental indicators throughout this small country reveal rapid deterioration. Degradation of water and air quality is severe and issues such as solid waste management, preservation of open spaces and pesticide usage require immediate national attention and resources. Beyond the physical causes of these problems, the article identifies the historical and cultural origins of Israel's ecological crises. A number of events converged during the 1990s, including the creation of an environmental Ministry, to produce a new era for the country's environmental movement and an attendant sense of optimism. The article proposes a number of fundamental revisions in public policy in such diverse areas as public transportation population policy, consolidation of ministerial authorities and environmental education that are necessary to move the country onto a sustainable route.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)116-134
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Developing Societies
Volume13
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jun 1997
Externally publishedYes

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