All of the protein interactions that link steroid receptor·Hsp90·immunophilin heterocomplexes to cytoplasmic dynein are common to plant and animal cells

Jennifer M. Harrell, Isaac Kurek, Adina Breiman, Christine Radanyi, Jack Michel Renoir, William B. Pratt*, Mario D. Galigniana

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Both plant and animal cells contain high molecular weight immunophilins that bind via tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains to a TPR acceptor site on the ubiquitous and essential protein chaperone hsp90. These hsp90-binding immunophilins possess the signature peptidylprolyl isomerase (PPIase) domain, but no role for their PPIase activity in protein folding has been demonstrated. From the study of glucocorticoid receptor (GR)·hsp90·immunophilin complexes in mammalian cells, there is considerable evidence that both hsp90 and the FK506 -binding immunophilin FKBP52 play a role in receptor movement from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. The role of FKBP52 is to target the GR·hsp90 complex to the nucleus by binding via its PPIase domain to cytoplasmic dynein, the motor protein responsible for retrograde movement along microtubules. Here, we use rabbit cytoplasmic dynein as a surrogate for the plant homologue to show that two hsp90-binding immunophilins of wheat, wFKBP73 and wFKBP77, bind to dynein. Binding to dynein is blocked by competition with a purified FKBP52 fragment comprising its PPIase domain but is not affected by the immunosuppressant drug FK506, suggesting that the PPIase domain but not PPIase activity is involved in dynein binding. The hsp90/hsp70-based chaperone system of wheat germ lysate assembles complexes between mouse GR and wheat hsp90. These receptor heterocomplexes contain wheat FKBPs, and they bind rabbit cytoplasmic dynein in a PPIase domain-specific manner. Retention by plants of the entire heterocomplex assembly machinery for linking the GR to dynein implies a fundamental role for this process in the biology of the eukaryotic cell.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5581-5587
Number of pages7
JournalBiochemistry
Volume41
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - 30 Apr 2002

Funding

FundersFunder number
National Cancer InstituteR01CA028010

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