Aggression and conduct disorder in former Soviet Union immigrant adolescents: The role of parenting style and ego identity

Ricky Finzi-Dottan*, Rinat Bilu, Pavel Golubchik

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The study examined aggression, guilt feelings and conduct disorder (CD) in adolescent immigrants from the Former Soviet Union. One hundred and nineteen adolescents, including sixty six immigrants and fifty native Israelis from four residential schools, completed questionnaires assessing level of aggression, sense of guilt, ego identity, and parenting style. Objective assessments of CD were obtained from instructors at the residential schools, using the CBCL. Results indicate that diffused ego identity is the strongest predictor of aggression, guilt, and CD. A lack of positive parenting moderates the link between diffused ego identity and aggression and CD, while positive parenting promotes a sense of guilt, especially in the immigrant group. These results warrant cultural identity-sensitive interventions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)918-926
Number of pages9
JournalChildren and Youth Services Review
Volume33
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2011

Keywords

  • Conduct disorder
  • Ego identity
  • Immigrant adolescents
  • Parenting methods
  • Residential schools

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