Age-and gender-related differences in success, major and minor complication rates and the duration of hospitalization after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty

Yoseph Rozenman*, Dan Gilon, Julian Zelingher, Dan Sapoznikov, Chaim Lotan, Morris Mosseri, A. Teddy Weiss, Yonathan Hasin, Mervyn S. Gotsman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This report describes the effect of age and gender on the results of balloon angioplasty using current technique and indications. A consecutive group of 2,067 patients who underwent angioplasty at a single institution after 1990 is described. Angioplastic success was 92.2% and similar among men and women and the various age groups. Sixteen patients (0.8%) died, and mortality among women was significantly higher (1.4 vs. 0.6%, p < 0.001). There were no age or gender differences in the rate of Q-wave myocardial infarction and the need for coronary artery bypass. Minor complications such as groin complications (10.5% women, 5.0% men; p < 0.001) and infections (6.4% women, 3.7% men; p < 0.05) were more common in women, and as a result the duration of hospitalization after angioplasty was longer. The length of hospitalization after angioplasty was longer with advanced age, mainly as a result of higher groin complications (p < 0.001), infections (p < 0.01) and renal failure (p < 0.05). We conclude that using current indications and technique, angioplasty can be performed safely with a high success rate. Mortality is higher among women. The length of hospitalization after angioplasty is longer in women and, at advanced age, due to higher rate of minor complications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)396-401
Number of pages6
JournalCardiology
Volume87
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 1996
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Age
  • Angioplasty
  • Complications
  • Mortality
  • Sex

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