Advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology, detection and management of cerebral amyloid angiopathy

Octavio M. Pontes-Neto, Eitan Auriel, Steven M. Greenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is pathologically defined as the deposition of amyloid protein, most commonly the amyloid β peptide (Aβ), primarily within the media and adventitia of small and medium-sized arteries of the leptomeninges, cerebral and cerebellar cortex. This deposition likely reflects an imbalance between Aβ production and clearance within the brain and leads to weakening of the overall structure of brain small vessels, predisposing patients tolobar intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH), brain ischaemia and cognitive decline. CAA is associated with markers of small vessel disease, like lobar microbleeds and white matter hyperintensities on magnetic resonance imaging. Therefore, it can be now be diagnosed during life with reasonable accuracy by clinical and neuroimaging criteria. Despite the lack of a specific treatment for this condition, the detection of CAA may help in the management of patients, regarding the prevention of major haemorrhagic complications and genetic counselling. This review discusses recent advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology, detection and management of CAA.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)134-139
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean Neurological Review
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Amyloid
  • Amyloid angiopathy
  • Cognitive decline
  • Intracerebral haemorrhage
  • Stroke

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