Admission plasma glucose levels within the normal to mildly impaired range and the outcome of patients with acute coronary syndrome

Kirill Buturlin, Saar Minha, Zach Rozenbaum, Yoram Neuman, Meital Shlezinger, Ilan Goldenberg, Morris Mosseri, David Pereg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

RESULTS: The 452 0 patients had a mean age of 61.7±13.5 years and were stratified into four quartiles according to admission plasma glucose (60-94, 95-105, 106-119, 120-140 mg/dl). Patients with higher admission plasma glucose were older and included a higher percentage of smokers. In addition, the higher the glucose so also did they have a poorer risk factor profile including a higher body mass index, total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels, and lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. During the first year 5.2% of patients died. A comparison of one-year mortality according to admission plasma glucose quartiles demonstrated a significant and progressive increase in mortality risk as admission plasma glucose rose (3.5%, 4.1%, 6.1%, 6.4%, respectively, p=0.001). However, this association lost its clinical significance following a multivariate analysis ( p=0.08).

CONCLUSIONS: High admission plasma glucose levels within the normal to mildly impaired range are associated with increased one-year mortality in non-diabetic acute coronary syndrome patients. However, the higher glucose level is probably not the cause for the adverse outcome but rather a marker for high risk. Our findings support the definition of 140 mg/dl as the cutoff for clinically acceptable admission glucose levels in patients with acute coronary syndrome.

BACKGROUND: Elevated admission plasma glucose levels >140 mg/dl are associated with adverse clinical outcomes in both diabetic and non-diabetic patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We aimed to evaluate the association between admission plasma glucose levels <140 mg/dl and the outcome of non-diabetic patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome.

METHODS: The study population consisted of patients with acute coronary syndrome included in the Acute Coronary Syndrome Israeli Survey during 2000-2013. Diabetic patients were excluded. The primary endpoint was all-cause mortality at one year.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)738-743
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean Heart Journal: Acute Cardiovascular Care
Volume6
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2017

Keywords

  • Glucose
  • acute coronary syndrome
  • mortality

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