Admission Norton scale scores (ANSS) correlate with rehabilitation outcome and length in elderly patients with deconditioning

Noam Guy, Yaffa Lerman, Dan Justo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We sought to determine if admission Norton scale scores (ANSS) used for evaluating pressure ulcer risk also correlate with rehabilitation outcome and length in elderly patients with deconditioning. This was a retrospective study conducted in a geriatric department between June 2008 and June 2010. The medical charts of consecutive elderly (≥65 years) patients admitted for rehabilitation due to deconditioning were studied for the following measurements: ANSS, admission albumin serum levels, mini-mental status examination (MMSE) scores, discharge walking functional independence measure (FIM) scores, discharge transfer FIM scores, and rehabilitation length. The cohort included 152 patients: 79 (52%) females and 73 (48%) males. Mean age was 83.6 ± 6.5 years. The three most common causes of deconditioning were pneumonia, congestive heart failure exacerbation, and falls. ANSS correlated with discharge walking FIM scores (r= 0.32; p= 0.003), discharge transfer FIM scores (r= 0.30; p= 0.005), and length of rehabilitation (r= -0.37; p< 0.0001), following adjustment for age, albumin serum levels, and MMSE scores. Linear regression analysis showed that ANSS were independently associated with discharge walking FIM scores (p= 0.004), discharge transfer FIM scores (p= 0.006), and rehabilitation length (p< 0.0001). We conclude that the Norton scoring system may be used for predicting the outcome and the length of rehabilitation in elderly patients with deconditioning.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)381-384
Number of pages4
JournalArchives of Gerontology and Geriatrics
Volume54
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Deconditioning
  • Norton scale
  • Rehabilitation

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