Admission hydration status and ischemic stroke outcome—experience from a national registry of hospitalized stroke patients

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Abstract

Reduced intravascular volume upon ischemic stroke (IS) admission has been associated with in-hospital complications, disability, and reduced survival. We aimed to evaluate the association of the urea-to-creatinine ratio (UCR) with disability or death at discharge, length of stay, in-hospital complications, and mortality during the first year. Using a national registry, we identified hospitalized IS patients without renal failure. Disability or death at discharge, length of stay, in-hospital complications, and mortality during the first year were studied by UCR, and associations between UCR levels and each outcome were assessed adjusting for age, sex, stroke severity, comorbidities, use of statins, and use of diuretics. In total, 2212 patients were included. Levels (median (25–75%)) for the main study variables were: urea 5.16 (3.66–6.83) mmol/L; creatinine 80 (64–92) µmol/L; and UCR 65 (58–74). Levels of UCR were significantly higher in patients with disability or death at discharge (p < 0.0001), those with complications during hospitalization (p = 0.03), those with infection during hospitalization (p = 0.0003), and those dead at 1 year (p < 0.0001). Analysis by UCR quartile showed that rates of disability or death at discharge, infections, complications overall, and death at 1 year in patients with UCR in the 4th quartile were significantly higher than in others. Risk-factor-adjusted analysis by UCR quartiles demonstrated an inconsistent independent association between UCR and disability or death after ischemic stroke. A high 1-year mortality rate was observed in IS patients with elevated UCR, yet this finding was not statistically significant after controlling for risk factors. Our study shows inconsistent associations between hydration status and poor functional status at discharge, and no association with length of stay, in-hospital complications (infectious and overall), and 1-year mortality.

Original languageEnglish
Article number3292
JournalJournal of Clinical Medicine
Volume10
Issue number15
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Aug 2021

Keywords

  • Complications
  • Creatinine
  • Death
  • Dehydration
  • Disability
  • Outcomes
  • Stroke

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