Adiponectin is better predictor of subclinical atherosclerosis than liver function tests in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

Elena Omelchenko, Dov Gavish, Marina Shargorodsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Adiponectin has recently been considered as a possible link between liver dysfunction and atherosclerosis in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The present study was designed to evaluate the relation between circulating adiponectin and arterial stiffness parameters, such as pulse wave velocity (PWV) and aortic augmentation index (AI), in patients with hepatic steatosis. The study group consisted of 52 subjects with NAFLD. PWV and AI were performed using SphygmoCor (version 7.1, AtCor Medical, Sydney, Australia). Metabolic parameters, homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance, and adiponectin levels were determined. Adiponectin was significantly, positively associated with AI (r = 0.467; P <.0001) and with PWV (r = 0.348; P =.011). No association between arterial stiffness parameters and liver function tests was observed. In a multiple linear regression analysis, adiponectin remained a significant predictor of PWV even after controlling for age, gender, and MAP. Serum adiponectin levels were significantly associated with indices of subclinical atherosclerosis, such as PWV and AI in patients with NAFLD. This association was independent of age, gender, and blood pressure level and suggests an active role of adiponectin in the pathophysiology of vascular disease in this particular population group.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)376-380
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American Society of Hypertension
Volume8
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2014

Keywords

  • Adiponectin
  • aortic augmentation index
  • nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
  • pulse wave velocity

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