Adequacy of spouses as informants regarding older persons' self-care practices and their perceived importance

Jiska Cohen-Mansfield, Barbara Jensen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In this article, the authors evaluate the knowledge of older spouses regarding each others' self-care practices and perceptions of their associated importance. Self-reports of customary self-care practices and proxy reports for the spouse were obtained from a convenience sample of 20 community-dwelling senior couples. Percent agreement was used for comparisons. Proxy-spouse agreement rates were lower than test-retest agreement and higher than agreement between random male-female dyads. Agreement rates were higher when couples were more similar. Wives were more reliable proxies than husbands, and proxies tended to overestimate the importance of self-care. A spouse can serve as an informant regarding self-care practices when self-report is not available. However, responses are subject to a degree of bias, because partners seem influenced by their own preferences in providing a proxy report, especially with respect to the importance of self-care.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)53-67
Number of pages15
JournalFamilies, Systems and Health
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2007

Keywords

  • Habit
  • Older adults
  • Proxy accuracy
  • Self-care
  • Spouses

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Adequacy of spouses as informants regarding older persons' self-care practices and their perceived importance'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this