Acute Bartholin’s abscess: microbial spectrum, patient characteristics, clinical manifestation, and surgical outcomes

H. Krissi*, A. Shmuely, A. Aviram, A. From, R. Edward, Y. Peled

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the patient characteristics, clinical manifestations, microbiology, and modes of treatment of a large cohort of women with acute Bartholin’s abscess, from a single medical center. A retrospective study was undertaken of all women diagnosed with acute Bartholin’s gland abscess who were admitted to the gynecology department in a university-affiliated tertiary hospital in central Israel from January 2004 to December 2013. A total of 267 women were included in the study. The mean age at diagnosis was 33.5 ± 12.1 years and the mean hospitalization period was 1.4 ± 0.9 days. Pain presented in 152 (56.9 %), swelling in 81 (30.3 %), and fever in 34 (12.7 %). Leukocytosis was detected in 149 (55.8 %). The three main treatment modalities were: antibiotics (75.7 %), abscess drainage (19.1 %), and marsupialization (80.9 %). Bacterial infections were detected in 154 (57.7 %) cultures, Escherichia coli presented in 59 (22.1 %), and Streptococcus species in 27 (10.1 %). The clinical and patient characteristics were similar between women with bacterial and sterile Bartholin’s abscesses, though leukocytosis was more prevalent among women with bacterial infections. E. coli was the single most frequent pathogen in cultures of acute Bartholin’s abscess. Respiratory tract-associated organisms were also common. This study indicates the polymicrobial spectrum of acute Bartholin’s abscess.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)443-446
Number of pages4
JournalEuropean Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
Volume35
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Mar 2016
Externally publishedYes

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