Acetabular labral reconstruction using the indirect head of the rectus femoris tendon significantly improves patient reported outcomes

Eyal Amar, Thomas G. Sampson, Zachary T. Sharfman*, Alyssa Caplan, Noa Rippel, Ran Atzmon, Michael Drexler, Ehud Rath

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose and hypothesis: The aim of this study was to evaluate outcomes after acetabular labral reconstruction using the indirect head of the rectus femoris tendon. The study hypothesis stated that arthroscopic acetabular labral reconstruction may improve patient reported outcomes in patients with labral tears that were not amenable to repair. Methods: Between 2009 and 2015, the senior author performed 31 acetabular labral reconstructions using the indirect head of the rectus femoris tendon. The graft is harvested through the same arthroscopic portals established for the procedure. The graft was gradually secured to the acetabular rim starting at its origin to the myotendinous junction, reestablishing the suction seal of the joint. Medical records and surgical reports were reviewed for demographic data, and outcome measures were assessed with pre- and postoperative modified Harris Hip Scores (mHHS). Results: Twenty-two patients with follow-up of more than 2 years were evaluated. Fourteen procedures were revision hip arthroscopy and 8 were primary labral reconstruction in 13 males and 9 females. The median age was 43 (range 22–68 years old). The median follow-up time was 36.2 months with a range from 24 to 72 months. The median preoperative mHHS was 67.1. Postoperatively, patients improved to a median mHHS of 97.8 (range 73.7–100) (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: Acetabular labral reconstruction using the indirect head of the rectus femoris tendon is a minimally invasive surgical procedure. The technique was applicable in all patients in this study with good outcomes. This procedure is clinically relevant for patients with large labral tears not amendable to labral repair as it offers good results using a local allograft. The local allograft is clinically advantageous as there is no additional donor-site morbidity and no risk of disease transmission. Level of evidence: IV.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2512-2518
Number of pages7
JournalKnee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy
Volume26
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Aug 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Hip arthroscopy
  • Labral reconstruction
  • Rectus femoris

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