Academic background, professional experience, and research achievements of United States academic ophthalmology leadership

Assaf Gershoni, Alon Tiosano, Oren Gabbay, Mor Schlesinger, Uri Elbaz, Edward Barayev, Gad Dotan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: To characterize the academic background, professional experience, and scholarly achievements of United States (US) academic ophthalmologists serving in leadership positions. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study. An online search of publicly available resources was conducted for demographics, background, research productivity, and academic appointments of academic ophthalmologists in leadership positions: chairperson (CP), vice chair (VC), service director (SD), and program director (PD). Results: Five hundred and fifty-one academic ophthalmologists in leadership positions were analyzed. A male predominance was found in all positions, ranging from 86% male CPs to 68% of SDs. Eighty-nine percent were graduates of US medical schools, and 97% completed their residency in a US ophthalmology program. Harvard Medical School and The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and their affiliated programs were the most frequently attended by leaders. The most common subspecialties among leaders were surgical retina (21%), cornea (18%), and glaucoma (16%). Overall, 18% of leaders are endowed professors, 34% are full professors, 25% are associate professors, and 20% are assistant professors. Overall, 28% of department leaders were residents and 16% were fellows in their current program. Chairpersons, followed by their vice, are the most academically proficient leaders within their departments, having the largest number of publications and h, hc, hm, and AWCR bibliometric indices. Conclusions: Ophthalmology leaders in all positions are highly accomplished with an established interest in research. Typically, CPs and their VCs have a longer duration of professional experience with a greater research output and a superior median academic appointment. Gender discrepancies within leadership positions are evident.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1605-1611
Number of pages7
JournalIrish Journal of Medical Science
Volume190
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2021

Keywords

  • Academic
  • Academic background
  • Ophthalmology leadership
  • Productivity
  • Professional experience
  • Research
  • Research achievements
  • h-index

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