A study of attitudes of viewers of the film "Shoah" towards an incident of mass murder by Israeli soldiers (Kfar Kassem, 1956)

Israel W. Charny*, Daphna Fromer

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In this study (which took place before the intifada), 107 viewers in Tel Aviv purchasing tickets to see the monumental movie "Shoah" were asked about an event of mass murder by Israelis of innocent, civilian Arab men, women and children at the village of Kfar Kassem in 1956. Sixty two percent opposed the massacre while 38% either accepted or "explained" it. Significant differences were found between Israelis in the mid-range of their lives (30-59), more of whom opposed the massacre (76%) than the very young and older (54%); and between non-Holocaust survivors, more of whom opposed the massacre (74%) than a combined group of Holocaust survivors, children of survivors and others who expressed a closeness to the Holocaust (54%). Nonsignificant trends for more frequent opposition to the massacre were seen among males than females, university educated than less than university educated, Israeli born than non-Israeli in country of origin, and younger age (up to 30) at time of immigration than older. Taken together, there emerges a suggestive picture of identification with use of power on the part of segments of the population traditionally understood to be weaker or lesser in status: the youngest and oldest, females, the less educated, immigrants to Israel-especially the older and those who suffer the Holocaust more deeply.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)303-318
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Traumatic Stress
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1992

Keywords

  • Holocaust
  • Israel-Arab conflict
  • Shoah
  • civilian attitudes
  • genocide
  • massacre
  • power
  • victimization

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