A sense of self-perceived collective victimhood in intractable conflicts

Daniel Bar-Tal, Lily Chernyak-Hai, Noa Schori, Ayelet Gundar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A sense of self-perceived collective victimhood emerges as a major theme in the ethos of conflict of societies involved in intractable conflict and is a fundamental part of the collective memory of the conflict. This sense is defined as a mindset shared by group members that results from a perceived intentional harm with severe consequences, inflicted on the collective by another group. This harm is viewed as undeserved, unjust and immoral, and one that the group could not prevent. The article analyses the nature of the self-perceived collective sense of victimhood in the conflict, its antecedents, the functions that it fulfils for the society and the consequences that result from this view.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)229-258
Number of pages30
JournalInternational Review of the Red Cross
Volume91
Issue number874
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

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