A rise in mean platelet volume during hospitalization for community-acquired pneumonia predicts poor prognosis: A retrospective observational cohort study

Oleg Gorelik, Irma Tzur, Dana Barchel, Dorit Almoznino-Sarafian, Muhareb Swarka, Ilia Beberashvili, Leonid Feldman, Natan Cohen, Shimon Izhakian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Clinical characteristics and the prognostic significance of changes in mean platelet volume (MPV) during hospitalization for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) have not been investigated. Methods: Among 976 adults hospitalized for CAP, clinical characteristics, in-hospital outcomes (transfer to the intensive care unit, treatment with mechanical ventilation, prolonged hospital stay and death), and all-cause mortality following discharge, were compared according to ΔMPV (MPV on discharge minus MPV on admission): groups A (no rising MPV, ΔMPV < 0.6 fL) and B (rising MPV, ΔMPV ≥ 0.6 fL). Results: Groups A and B comprised 83.8% and 16.2% of patients, respectively. Patients with a rise in MPV were more likely to be older, and to present with renal dysfunction, cerebrovascular disorder and severe pneumonia than were patients with no rise in MPV. On discharge, lower values of platelets and higher levels of neutrophils were observed in group B. Rising MPV strongly predicted a need for mechanical ventilation and in-hospital death (the respective relative risks: 2.62 and 6.79; 95% confidence intervals: 1.54-4.45 and 3.48-13.20). The respective 90-day, 3-year and total (median follow-up of 54 months) mortality rates were significantly higher in group B (29.1%, 43.0% and 50.0%) than group A (7.3%, 24.2% and 32.6%), p < 0.001 for all comparisons. A rise in MPV was a powerful predictor of all-cause mortality (relative risk 1.26 and 95% confidence interval 1.11-1.43). Conclusions: Rising MPV during hospitalization for CAP is associated with a more severe clinical profile than no rise in MPV. A rise in MPV strongly predicts in-hospital and long-term mortality.

Original languageEnglish
Article number137
JournalBMC Pulmonary Medicine
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 30 Oct 2017

Keywords

  • Community-acquired pneumonia
  • Hospitalization
  • Mean platelet volume
  • Prognosis

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