A renewed outbreak of the COVID−19 pandemic: A longitudinal study of distress, resilience, and subjective well-being

Shaul Kimhi, Yohanan Eshel, Hadas Marciano, Bruria Adini*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Considering the potential impact of COVID-19 on the civil society, a longitudinal study was conducted to identify levels of distress, resilience, and the subjective well-being of the population. The study is based on two repeated measurements conducted at the end of the pandemic’s “first wave” and the beginning of the “second wave” on a sample (n = 906) of Jewish Israeli respondents, who completed an online questionnaire distributed by an Internet panel company. Three groups of indicators were assessed: signs of distress (sense of danger, distress symptoms, and perceived threats), resilience (individual, community, and national), and subjective well-being (well-being, hope, and morale). Results indicated the following: (a) a significant increase in distress indicators, with effect sizes of sense of danger, distress symptoms, and perceived threats (Cohen’s d 0.614, 0.120, and 0.248, respectively); (b) a significant decrease in resilience indicators, with effect sizes of individual, community, and national resilience (Cohen’s d 0.153, 0.428, and 0.793, respectively); and (c) a significant decrease in subjective well-being indicators with effect sizes of well-being, hope, and morale (Cohen’s d 0.116, 0.336, and 0.199, respectively). To conclude, COVID-19 had a severe, large-scale impact on the civil society, leading to multidimensional damage and a marked decrease in the individual, community, and national resilience of the population.

Original languageEnglish
Article number7743
Pages (from-to)1-13
Number of pages13
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume17
Issue number21
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Nov 2020

Funding

FundersFunder number
Israeli Science Ministry

    Keywords

    • COVID-19
    • Community and national resilience
    • Distress symptoms
    • Hope and morale
    • Individual
    • Perceived threats
    • Sense of danger
    • Well-being

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