A new thermography-based approach to early detection of cancer utilizing magnetic nanoparticles theory simulation and in vitro validation

Arie Levy, Abraham Dayan, Moshe Ben-David, Israel Gannot*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

49 Scopus citations

Abstract

This work describes the utilization of tumor-specific magnetic nanoparticles together with an alternating magnetic field as a means to thermally mark a tumor so as to detect it using a thermal imaging system. Experiments were conducted using an in vitro tissue model, an inductive heating system, and an infrared camera. The thermal images, recorded by the infrared camera during the experiments, were analyzed using an algorithm that was developed as part of this work. The results show that small tumor phantoms (diameter of 0.5 mm) that were embedded under the surface of the tissue phantom (up to 14 mm below the surface) can be detected and located, indicating that the proposed method could potentially offer considerable advantages over conventional thermography and other methods for cancer early detection. Nevertheless, several issues should be clarified in future studies before the method can be offered for clinical use. From the Clinical Editor: Tumor-specific magnetic nanoparticles exposed to an alternating magnetic field provide a method to thermally mark a tumor for detection using thermal imaging systems. In-vitro tissue model experiments demonstrated that tumor phantoms of 0.5mm up to 14mm below the surface can be detected and located, indicating that the proposed method could offer considerable advantages over conventional thermography.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)786-796
Number of pages11
JournalNanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology, and Medicine
Volume6
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2010

Keywords

  • Antibody targeting
  • Magnetic nanoparticles
  • Thermography

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A new thermography-based approach to early detection of cancer utilizing magnetic nanoparticles theory simulation and in vitro validation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this