A negative second trimester triple test and absence of specific ultrasonographic markers may decrease the need for genetic amniocentesis in advanced maternal age by 60%

D. J.D. Rosen*, I. Kedar, A. Amiel, T. Ben-Tovim, Y. Petel, H. Kaneti, M. Tohar, M. D. Fejgin

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: A study was conducted to evaluate the sensitivity of combining a second trimester triple test and targeted ultrasound in order to detect Down syndrome in women undergoing amniocentesis over 35 years of age. Methods: Women over 35 years of age underwent a triple test and an ultrasound examination for chromosomal markers immediately prior to genetic amniocentesis. Results: One thousand and six women were examined. Four hundred and thirty seven were triple test-positive and in 195 cases ultrasonographic abnormalities were observed. Thirteen had Down syndrome and eight had other chromosomal abnormalities. All women with Down syndrome babies were triple test-positive and seven also had ultrasonographic markers. Three of eight women who had babies with chromosomal aberrations other then Down syndrome were also triple test-positive. Conclusions: The use of the triple test as a screening tool in our population would reduce the number of amniocenteses by 60%, while no cases of Down syndrome would be missed. Ultrasonographic markers have added little to this population. Three non-Down syndrome chromosomal abnormalities and two Down syndrome mosaic cases would be missed by this approach.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)59-63
Number of pages5
JournalPrenatal Diagnosis
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

Keywords

  • AFP
  • Amniocentesis
  • Down syndrome
  • Ultrasound

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