A multivariate analysis of risk factors for acquiring bacteriuria in patients with indwelling urinary catheters for longer than 24 hours

M. Shapiro, E. Simchen, S. Izraeli, T. G. Sacks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Data related to risk factors for catheter-acquired bacteriuria were collected prospectively on 112 patients consecutively catheterized for >24 hours at the Hadassah University Hospital. Logistic regression analysis indicated that factors independently associated (p≤0.05) with a higher risk of catheter-acquired bacteriuria were as follows: hospitalization in orthopedics or urology, ethnic origin (Arabs > Jews), insertion of a catheter after the sixth day of hospitalization, catheterization outside the operating theaters, lack of administration of systemic antibiotics, unsatisfactory catheter care, and prolonged duration (≥7 days) of catheterization before infection occurred. The risk associated with catheterization outside the operating theater could be explained by its correlate, that is, catheterization for incontinence/obstruction as opposed to output measurement. Life-table analyses demonstrated that the daily risk for acquiring bacteriuria during the first six days of catheterization was higher among patients ultimately catheterized for ≥7 days than among those ultimately chaterized for <7 days (P<0.05).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)525-532
Number of pages8
JournalInfection Control
Volume5
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 1984
Externally publishedYes

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