A longitudinal evaluation of medication use among the old-old population in Israel

Tzvia Blumstein, Dov Shmotkin, Nitza Eyal, Aviva Shorek, Liat Lerner-Geva

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examined patterns and predictors of change in medication use among old-old participants (aged 75 to 94 years) in a three-wave national Israeli study. The findings indicated a significant increase in the number of medications on short-term follow-up (3.6 years) and a modest, marginally significant increase in the long term (11.7 years). The number of medications was predicted by predisposing characteristics and baseline needs of physical and mental health, explaining 20% of the variance in the short- and long-term models. Women, married individuals, and those with low perceived health and low depressive symptoms tended to increase their use in the short term, whereas men, low-income individuals, and those with higher comorbidities and low difficulties in instrumental activity of daily living tended to increase their use in the long term. The leveling of medication use found on long-term follow-up highlights the particular dynamics of health behavior and health care practices relating to the old-old population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)55-73
Number of pages19
JournalResearch on Aging
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2008

Keywords

  • Longitudinal study
  • Medication use
  • Old-old

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