'A land without a people': An evaluation of nations' efficiency-based territorial claims

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This paper considers the role of efficiency arguments in grounding territorial rights from a liberal perspective. The view advanced here is pitted against some recent arguments voiced by Margaret Moore opposing the inclusion of any efficiency criterion in our moral reasoning about territorial entitlement. Though I argue against this view, my own conclusion - favouring the adoption of only a moderated version of such principles - is a relatively mild one. It maintains, on the one hand, that the beneficial use of land is morally relevant to determining its rightful owner, but, on the other hand, it also recognizes the limitations of any such principle of utilization. Ultimately, there are good moral reasons for viewing the way in which a given land has been put to use as a relevant component (though admittedly only one) of our account of territorial entitlement.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)959-973
Number of pages15
JournalPolitical Studies
Volume50
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2002

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of ''A land without a people': An evaluation of nations' efficiency-based territorial claims'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this