A genetic variant in the gene encoding adrenomedullin predicts the development of dysglycemia over 6.4 years in Chinese

Kwok Leung Ong, Annette W.K. Tso, Raymond Y.H. Leung, Stacey S. Cherny, Pak Chung Sham, Tai Hing Lam, Bernard M.Y. Cheung, Karen S.L. Lam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Adrenomedullin, a vasodilatory peptide, facilitates the differentiation of pre-adipocytes, and affects lipolysis and glucose uptake. We investigated the association of common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the gene encoding adrenomedullin (ADM) with dysglycemia in the Hong Kong Chinese population. Methods: Four SNPs were genotyped in 1391 subjects without dysglycemia at baseline from the Hong Kong Cardiovascular Risk Factor Prevalence Study-2, which had a median follow-up time of 6.4. years. Dysglycemia included impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, and diabetes according to the WHO 1998 criteria. At follow-up, 382 subjects had developed dysglycemia. Results: In stepwise logistic regression, the SNP rs11042725 was a significant independent predictor of the development of dysglycemia (OR=1.31, P=0.012), together with baseline age (P< 0.001), plasma triglycerides (P< 0.001), body mass index (P=0.004), 2-h glucose after oral glucose tolerance test (P< 0.001), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index (P=0.045), and follow-up duration (P=0.009). The association was more significant in women (P=0.002) and in subjects without regular exercise (P=0.001). Conclusions: Our study suggests a potential role of genetic variants in the ADM gene in the development of dysglycemia in our local Chinese population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)353-357
Number of pages5
JournalClinica Chimica Acta
Volume412
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - 30 Jan 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adrenomedullin
  • Dysglycemia
  • Single nucleotide polymorphism

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