A general three-dimensional parametric geometry of the native aortic valve and root for biomechanical modeling

Rami Haj-Ali, Gil Marom, Sagit Ben Zekry, Moshe Rosenfeld, Ehud Raanani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The complex three-dimensional (3D) geometry of the native tricuspid aortic valve (AV) is represented by select parametric curves allowing for a general construction and representation of the 3D-AV structure including the cusps, commissures and sinuses. The proposed general mathematical description is performed by using three independent parametric curves, two for the cusp and one for the sinuses. These curves are used to generate different surfaces that form the structure of the AV. Additional dependent curves are also generated and utilized in this process, such as the joint curve between the cusps and the sinuses. The model's feasibility to generate patient-specific parametric geometry is examined against 3D-transesophageal echocardiogram (3D-TEE) measurements from a non-pathological AV. Computational finite-element (FE) mesh can then be easily constructed from these surfaces. Examples are given for constructing several 3D-AV geometries by estimating the needed parameters from echocardiographic measurements. The average distance (error) between the calculated geometry and the 3D-TEE measurements was only 0.78±0.63. mm. The proposed general 3D parametric method is very effective in quantitatively representing a wide range of native AV structures, with and without pathology. It can also facilitate a methodical quantitative investigation over the effect of pathology and mechanical loading on these major AV parameters.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2392-2397
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Biomechanics
Volume45
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - 21 Sep 2012

Keywords

  • Biomechanics
  • Echocardiography
  • Finite element
  • Geometric representation
  • Heart valve

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